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Manufactured by O. F. Mossberg & Sons, Mossberg 500 is a series of pump-action shotguns, very much treasured for their reliability and value.

Popular Shotguns: Mossberg 500 Review

Popular Shotguns: Mossberg 500 ReviewManufactured by O.F. Mossberg & Sons, Mossberg 500 is a series of pump-action shotguns, very much treasured for their reliability and value. The fact that more than 10,000,000 of them have been manufactured in the last 50 years makes the Mossberg 500 one of the most respected shotguns out there. It has been nicknamed ‘Mossy’ and some say it’s so popular that every shooter owns, has owned or will own one at some point in their lives. The shotgun has been designed with a dual action bar. This particular feature was introduced in 1970, after the original single-action bar was reported to bind and break, making the gun unsafe and easily broken. It also has a single large locking lug, used to secure the breech. You can find the magazine tube located directly below the barrel, screwed into the receiver. On the left rear of the trigger bar you have the slide release and the safety, often called the “tang safety” is on the upper rear of the receiver. Given the fact that it was originally designed to be used in very harsh conditions, such as combat or hunting ducks or geese, so hunting near a water, one of its main design traits is easy cleaning and maintaining. Mossberg 500 Variants As far as variants go, the name “Mossberg 500” does not mean a single type of shotguns, but rather covers an entire range of guns, meant for 3 inch magnum shells. However, if we were to speak about the standard model, this one holds five 2.75 inch or four 3 inch shells in the magazine and another spare one in the chamber. It also comes in 12 and 20 gauge and .410 bore. Interestingly enough, at one point during its history, a 16 gauge was introduced, but was quickly discontinued. Here are the variants: Field models – basic sporting models available for purchase in a wide variety of finishes and lengths. They can be customized for hunting waterfowl, upland game, turkeys or for shooting slugs with the special slug barrel. Special purpose models – they are designed for self-defense and for military and police use. For example, the 590 and the eight-shot Model 500 are sold solely as special purpose shotguns. They all have short barrels, which are completely interchangeable with ones of the same length in the 500 branch. They also come with special designations, such as SPC, Mossberg 500 Tactical Persuader or Mossberg 500 Mariner. Law enforcement models – although they might sound the same as the special purpose models, they are different, in the sense that the former have heavier duty barrels, trigger guards, safeties and they will be a lot more resistant to hard use. These particular models are the 590A1s. They are sold in 12 gauge, with 18.5-inch and 28-inch barrels, Mossberg 500 pistol grip and sling. The Law Enforcement shotguns were also sold as a combo, with the same features. Home security models – this is the HS410 and it’s only available in .410. Also, as its named states, it has been specifically designed for defense usage. It is known to be the least powerful common shotgun, but users have reported it to be an amazing weapon nonetheless. It has been marketed towards beginners, who only want a weapon that’s simple and easy to use but effective at the same time. Also, an important mention is the fact that it’s sold with a training video about safety and usage. Apart from these variants, there are also some riot gun versions of the pistol grip 500, such as Mossberg 500 Persuader, Mossberg 500 Cruiser, Road Blocker and Mariner. They all come with an 18.5 inch and 20 inch barrel. It depends on the magazine capacity. One could also purchase the 500 Flex, which is basically your standard Mossberg 500 paired with the FLEX TLS tool-less locking system. Thusly, the shotgun turns into a very adaptable weapon, which allows the users to switch between different shooting applications in almost not time at all and with their bare hands. Another big hit with Mossberg fans was the 500 Chainsaw, also called “The Zombie Killer”. What differentiates it from all the other shotguns is the fact that is has a chainsaw top grip which allows the user much more muzzle control. It’s aimed for serious shooting and a plus is that you can easily remove the grip and transform it into a standard fore-end. Mossberg Accessories Mossberg also markets a wide array of tactical accessories, like stocks and barrels, which allow the user to make many combinations. In the past, they even offered a bullpup configured 500. If one buys the appropriate Mossberg 500 accessories, he or she can transform their favorite weapon into a field gun, a slug gun, a defensive weapon either for civilians, the police or military forces or even into a trap or skeet gun. The Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870 Debate There has always been a debate centered around the Remington 870 vs Mossberg 500. People always seem to wonder if they should buy one or the other. Looking a bit into that debate, both guns are inexpensive, they have both seen action in the field, in battle and with the police. One difference would be the fact that the 870 is what’s called a “youth model”, given the fact that it has been most people’s first shotgun, used during hunting. Of course, there are pros and cons to both. People say the 870 is a subpar gun these days, with its makers no longer caring for quality, since it’s become such a household name. On the other hand, Mossberg 500 is a working device that is good for anything from squirrels to coyotes, but it’s very ugly to look at. The 870 is said to be too big, while the 500 won’t jam no matter what. One thing that I can tell you for sure regarding this debate is that, should you have any doubts about which one to choose, the best thing is to try them both out, rather than focusing on opinions expressed online. People are normally biased when it comes to their guns, have emotional attachments towards them and that might be misleading in the Mossberg 500 vs Remington 870 problem. Mossberg 500 is on sale for the price of under $500, which is one of the main reasons why it’s such a beloved weapon. Mossberg 500 Finish Regarding finishes, the Mossberg 500 has an anodized aluminum alloy receiver, with polished and blued barrels. There are also camouflage painted models, in different patterns, while stocks can be made either of wood or composite. There’s a Mariner model available as well, with a silver finish, highly resistant to corrosion and paired with black composite stocks,  which is called the Marinecote finish.

Magpul UBR Gen II

Magpul UBR Gen II

Looks like we have a cheaper, lighter UBR hitting the shelves this year. Yea, I would like to try it. A nice cheek weild and adjustible stock sounds like a nice combo. As is, it’s pretty pricey and I haven’t had the opportunity to handle the original though I loved the concept.  Here’s to hoping Magpul releases some more killer gear at SHOT! Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

6.5mm Ammo Breakdown: Best 6.5 Calibers for Accuracy & Distance

6.5mm Ammo Breakdown: Best 6.5 Calibers for Accuracy & Distance

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Why is the 6.5 mm family of rounds so popular? Common Rifle Calibers It’s been tried, tested, and put to good use since 1894 when the 6.5x55mm Swedish Mauser cartridge was invented and used by the Swedish and Norwegian military forces for a whopping 101 years. 6. "5x55mm Swedish Mauser" 16 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 16 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing While the Swedish Mauser is still being used today, there are a number of other contenders within the 6.5mm cartridge family that helped to contribute to its newfound popularity. Today, we’re going to take a look at just what the buzz is all about with the 6.5mm family of rounds, and what the differences are between them. Let’s get to it. What Makes the 6.5mm Family of Rounds So Popular? Rounds like the 6.5mm Creedmoor and 6.5mm Grendel have helped catapult this powerful round into stardom. Assorted 6.5 Creedmoor (L to R: Federal FMJ, Soft 129gr, Ballistic Tip 120gr, Gold Medal 140gr) They’ve become a common round for some of our most favorite rifles, including hunting rifles by Ruger and Savage, rifles on the AR-10 and AR-15 platforms, and tactical sniper rifles like the Ruger Precision Rifle. Best Long-Range Beginner's Bang For The Buck "Ruger Precision Rifle" 1200 at GunPrime Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1200 at GunPrime Compare prices (3 found) GunPrime (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing But the cartridge’s popularity begs the question: what came first, the chicken or the egg?  Or in this case, the popularity of the rifles or the round? The truth is that the 6.5mm round began to gain popularity once it became a favorite among competitive shooters who loved the round because it remains powerful and accurate but offers less recoil than the .308 Win.  In many ways, shooters felt like the 6.5mm gave them a competitive advantage over the .308 cartridge – and thus a new generation of sniper rifles compatible with the 6.5mm was born. In addition, the 6.5mm’s rise to fame also coincides with the increased popularity of tactical precision rifle shooting competitions. But what exactly are the differences between the various members of the 6.5mm family?  Let’s take a look. 6.5x55mm Swedish Mauser The one that started it all.  The 6.5x55mm Swedish Mauser is nearly 125 years old and is still going strong.  Known for its low recoil and pinpoint accuracy, this round has really been able to stand out in competitive shooting and on mid-sized hunting trips. Swedish Mausers on a clip Even in today’s terms, the Swedish Mauser is more than a functional cartridge – it’s downright lethal.  It’s been featured in a variety of hunting rifles, including the Remington 700 and the Winchester Model 70, and has been a favorite for deer, elk, reindeer, and moose hunts. 6.5mm Grendel The 6.5mm Grendel is an AR-15 round that’s been around for almost 15 years now.  It’s designed with the intention of being more accurate than its .223 counterpart, while also being able to boost power without adding any real recoil. 6.5mm Grendel 25 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 25 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing Generally speaking, you’ll find mixed reviews with regard to whether Grendel is better than the .223, but it is praised for being able to travel 800 yards without losing significant accuracy. In addition, the Grendel will fit in your standard 5.56x45mm magazine and turn a 30-round mag into a 20-round one. In terms of hunting, the Grendel has developed quite the cult following who prefer it over the .308 Win.  For starters, it has all of the knockdown power needed to drop that beastly buck or elk, plus it’s lighter and offers less recoil than the .308. 6.5mm Grendel with several bullet options The only real problem that some shooters have is availability.  While the .308 is certainly not going anywhere anytime soon, some people are worried if 6.5mm cartridges like the Grendel will be less popular in the next decade or two. Personally, I don’t think they’re going anywhere.  If you agree…we recommend the Ballistic Advantage barrels . Ballistic Advantage 6.5mm Grendel Barrels 250 at Ballistic Advantage Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 250 at Ballistic Advantage Prices accurate at time of writing 6.5mm Creedmoor The 6.5mm Creedmoor is a beast that’s designed specifically to compete with the .308 Win cartridge.  Many hunters believe that the Creedmoor is an all-around better round due to the fact that it’s lighter, faster, and offers up far less recoil than its Winchester counterpart. 6.5mm Creedmoor 22 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 22 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing That’s not to say that the .308 isn’t an excellent hunting round, but tests show that the 6.5 Creedmoor does perform better between 700 – 1000 yards than the .308. The truth is that the 6.5mm Creedmoor’s performance has been impressing marksmen for a decade. 6.5 Creedmoor Even the US Military has been looking into dropping the 7.62mm and switching over to a 6.5mm Creedmoor because of its better performance and significantly less wind drift than the current long-range round. Sig Sauer 6.5 Creedmoor Hunting Whether or not the military will go through with the switch remains to be seen, but it does prove that the 6.5mm Creedmoor is an exemplary round for long-distance shooting. Popular 6.5 Creedmoor Ammo And it’s easy to get into…if you already have an AR-10 (.308) platform, all you need is a complete 6.5mm Creedmoor upper.  We suggest the Aero Precision 20″ or 22″ . Aero Precision 6.5mm Creedmoor Upper 635 at Aerp Precision Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 635 at Aerp Precision Prices accurate at time of writing And if you’re building…the bolt and magazines are the same…all you’ll need is a new barrel.  We recommend Ballistic Advantage . Ballistic Advantage 6.5 Creedmoor Barrel 295 at Ballistic Advantage Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 295 at Ballistic Advantage Prices accurate at time of writing 6.5x47mm Lapua Designed specifically for bench shooting, the 6.5x47mm Lapua is a mid-sized cartridge that provides accuracy and minimal recoil when compared to the .308 Winchester.  Generally speaking, it functions quite similarly to the .260 Remington, but with one added benefit: guns that shoot the .308 can easily be converted to fire the 6.5mm Lapua. 6.5x47mm Lapua 145 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 145 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Because the 6.5mm Lapua and the .308 share similar dimensions, all you need to do to make the transition over is swap out the barrel.  And compared to the 6.5mm Creedmoor, the 6.5mm Lapua delivers the same overall level of accuracy. 6.5×47 Lapua, with a cutaway view on left Most popular with bench shooting the 6.5mm Lapua is most often reloaded instead of store bought. If you’re interested in getting into reloading your own ammo, you’ll find our Beginner’s Guide to Reloading to be a great place to start. .260 Remington The .260 Remington (or 6.5-08 for you folks in countries that speak metric) was created primarily to compete with the 6.5x55mm Swedish Mauser.  Like other 6.5mm cartridges, it boasts accurate at longer ranges and less recoil than the .308 Win.  Its accuracy has made it a popular round of long-range shooting competitions up to 1000 meters. .260 Remington 29 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 29 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing The biggest complaint about the .260 Remington round historically was the lack of variety.  But these days, you can find the .260 in a number of different grain weights.  Aside from that, it’s also said to be a little harsher on the barrel than its .308 counterpart. Remington .260 Still, the .260 is an excellent round for law enforcement and hunting.  While not as popular as the .308, it can be used to take down medium game with relative ease. .264 Winchester Magnum The .264 Winchester Mag has been around since 1959.  And while it’s always been a solid cartridge, it never really saw the popularity that it deserved.  Some of this was its reputation for being extremely harsh on the barrel, but it didn’t really cause any more stress than most other magnum rounds. . "264 Winchester Magnum" The .264 Winchester was pretty accurate round, but it doesn’t do nearly the distance as some of the other 6.5mm cartridges.  In fact, you can probably expect around a three-inch drop as soon as the bullet travels about 500 yards.  With that said, it’s always been a solid cartridge for a mid-sized game like deer and elk. These days, the .264 isn’t quite the barrel-eating round that it was known for in the 1960s.  You can thank that on the improved technology that’s helped make barrel steel stronger and more protected against wear and tear.  So what was known to eat away at barrel throats after 100 or so shots now holds up anywhere between 700 and 1000 fired rounds. The downside of .264 win mag? Well, unless you reload – it can be nearly impossible to find. Fact is, I couldn’t find a single store online that had it in stock. 6.5mm vs .308 Winchester Now that the 6.5mm family has finally experienced the popularity it’s always deserved, a lot of people are forsaking their .308s for these smoother rounds.  But does that mean that the .308 Win has been made obsolete? Short answer: no. Some 6.5mm cartridges, left to right: .264 Winchester Magnum, 6.5×55mm Swedish, .260 Remington, 6.5mm Creedmoor, 6.5mm Grendel Unless you’re doing most of your hunting from long-range, you’re not really going to feel too much of a difference between the .308 and your 6.5mm cartridge – especially if you’re shooting at a target less than 300 yards away.  In this context, they’re both quite equal in effectiveness at dropping a mid-sized animal. .308 168 gr Hornady Match BTHP vs ELD It’s also important to remember that the .308 is always going to be readily available due to its popularity.  While I firmly believe that the 6.5mm cartridges aren’t going anywhere in the future, they just haven’t reached the same level of usage as the .308, which means that you might not always be able to pick up a box of Grendel or Creedmoor in a pinch. It doesn’t make one cartridge better than the other – it’s just a numbers game that the .308 happens to win. Alternative AR-15 cartridges However, when we’re talking about competition shooting, a round like the 6.5 Creedmoor, 6.5 Grendel, or 6.5 Lapua – and even the .260 Remington – is going to outperform the .308 nearly every time.  That lack of recoil and improved accuracy between 700 – 1000 yards is crucial in making the 6.5mm family better cartridges for long-distance shooting (and even tactical situations). But remember, both the .308 and the 6.5mm family serve different purposes . At the end of the day, shooting a Grendel or Creedmoor doesn’t make you a better shooter.  It’s about knowing the limitations of each cartridge you’re shooting with.  If you do that, you’re already on your way towards being a marksman. Anyone here rocking an AR-10, AR-15, or bolt-action hunting rifle with 6.5mm ammo?  Have a favorite member of the 6.5mm family? Let us know!

Two New 1911 Pistols from Taylors & Company

Two New 1911 Pistols from Taylors & Company

Known for its accurate reproductions of historical western firearms, Taylor’s & Company has unveiled two new 1911 pistols, designed for tactical- and concealed-carry-minded customers. Taylor’s & Company has made available the 1911 A1 Full-Size 5” and 1911 Compact Carry 3⅝”, both chambered in 9mm. The company offers a range of historical firearms, and the 1911 remains a significant player in that market. The Full-Size implements modern features, such as a green, fiber-optic front sight, a skeletonized trigger and a short picatinny rail to provide accessory-mounting options. The pistol sells with two 10-round magazines. The Compact Carry size and ergonomics provide comfort and versatility. The model holds nine rounds and features snag-free sights, a thumb safety and a hi-sweep beavertail grip. It also sells with two 8-round magazines. Taylor’s CEO Tammy Loy expects positive reception to the new offerings. “We are excited to add additional options to our 1911 lineup,” Loy said. “By adding a 9mm option alongside our existing .45ACP offerings, we think concealed carry and 9mm 1911s will continue to see demand.” The 1911 has a rich history, dating back to the start of the 1900s, thanks to its designer John Moses Browning. The U.S. military was searching for a new service pistol that would use the .45 Automatic Colt Pistol (.45ACP) cartridge. Browning threw his now-famous design into the competition. His pistol was a magazine-fed, single-action, semi-automatic pistol that featured both manual and grip safeties. The pistol went into military testing in 1906. Browning was up against other prominent manufacturers, such as Smith & Wesson. Browning’s pistol passed the military testing that put the gun through its paces. The 1911 fired several thousand rounds without a single malfunction. It was the first pistol tested to reach that accomplishment. The pistol was finally adopted by the U.S. Army on March 29, 1911, hence it being called the Model 1911. A couple of years later, the Navy and Marines also adopted the 1911. Eventually, the original 1911 was updated with a few improvements, such as a shorter trigger and better sights. In 1924, the pistol adopted the name 1911A1. The 1911A1 served in various smaller conflicts between the World Wars and became the sidearm of choice for many soldiers and law-enforcement officers across the nation. When the United States found itself engulfed in the Second World War in 1941, it produced nearly 3 million 1911 pistols for the war effort. Even after the war ended, the 1911 continued to serve with soldiers across the globe. In 1985, after decades of valued service, the widely respected pistol was officially retired, replaced by the U.S. Army with the Beretta 92F. However, that didn’t stop the 1911 from continuing its legacy with millions of civilians. John Browning’s pistol lives on with many target shooters and collectors to this day. Taylor’s wants to help keep the platform alive and well with its latest offerings. The Full-Size has an MSRP of $707, and the Compact Carry is $644. Both pistols can be purchased at taylorsfirearms.com. About Taylor’s & Company Founded in 1988, Taylor’s & Company, headquartered in Winchester, Va., is an importer of firearms, including revolvers, rifles and shotguns. The company specializes in reproduction Civil War firearms through the end of the Old West era, hunting firearms and 1911 tactical pistols. It markets its products through dealers and distributors nationwide and assists consumers in obtaining a dealer for firearm transfers as needed. It seeks to serve all types of shooters, from competitive shooters to collectors to outdoor enthusiasts to firearm history buffs. For more information, visit taylorsfirearms.com.

Daughters at the Range Proves Girls Want to Learn About Firearms

What happens when you decide to help young girls learn about firearm? You get an annual event that is exploding in popularity. Firearms and shooting have not always been a part of Janette Story’s life. But after her husband passed away in 2005, she had three different scares. “The ‘what if’s’ got to me,” she says. “I decided I needed to learn to protect myself. There was a commercial on TV with the Susan B. Anthony quote, ‘I declare to you that woman must not depend upon the protection of man, but must be taught to protect herself, and there I take my stand.’ I thought, ‘OK, God, I’m listening to this one,” she laughs. “So I went online and registered to get my concealed carry license and proceeded to learn.” From there Janette took as much training as she could get. “I felt like I didn’t know anything,” she says. Then a gentlemen at the gun club suggested participating in National Take Your Daughters to the Range Day. “We did that for a couple of years, then it folded,” she explains. “But by that time our group was going full blast, so I started doing Daughters at the Range . The first year we figured if we had three girls we would call it a success.” It was more than a success with 60 girls and 50 volunteers. From there it continued to grow. “The community support is wonderful,” Janette says. “’ The Outdoorsman’ , a local firearms dealer provides t-shirts for gift bags. ‘ Field and Streams , ’ another local firearms dealer, provides a firearm which is given to one of the parents by luck of the draw. The last two years we received backpacks from Gunbroker.com . The Gun Cleaners mobile unit comes out of Houston to clean all of our guns. The local Marine Bulldog Association comes in and cooks for us. The food is the only thing that costs and that money supports the local "Marine Bulldog Association" scholarship program for the Concho Valley. The Area10 coordinators from the Texas Youth Hunting Program have a booth and conduct the rifle safety program for each rotation. The San Angelo Police Department provides the National Shooting Sports Foundation Project Child Safe program. And of course, the San Angelo Gun Club is great to host us.” Janette explains how the event works. “We start the day at 6:30am with 125 volunteers. We have one-on-one instruction, and mentors following instructions of the range masters. Safety officers also watch the groups. We work in rotations of six to seven girls at a time for pistol for about an hour. Rifle rotations lasts about an hour and a half for up to 16 girls per rotation who shoot supported from the bench. We set up a bay or two so that girls can try bench rest and silhouette shooting.” “We prefer that the girls are new shooters, we love it when they have never shot before. But that doesn’t mean they can’t come if they have experience shooting, but we do have a limit on the number of girls who can attend,” explains Janette. “We promote firearms safety and the shooting sports. An interesting thing is, that about half the families aren’t shooters or just don’t know much about it, and they may only be bringing their daughters out to learn about firearm safety. But by the time they all sit through orientation along with their girls, they understand a lot more. This may be the only time they are ever exposed to this, and they may never pick up another gun. But every one of them leaves with a smile on their face – and so do the volunteers,” says Janette. Those smiles are Janette’s favorite, and most memorable part, of the event. “The smiles on their faces, the excitement when the girls are finished, and the excitement of the volunteers, are amazing. If it weren’t exciting to everyone, it wouldn’t happen.” The other amazing part to Janette is how popular the program is and how quick the response is. “Last year we opened registration on April 15. In less than 24 hours we had 103 girls registered, half had never attended before. We only sent the notice to those who had attended previously, so it shows that they shared their emails. That alone was a fascinating response.” Unfortunately, there were weather issues, so they rescheduled from June to August. Then it rained 4 ½ inches that day, so the event was cancelled. But 180 girls had registered, showing the popularity of the event. Janette is also looking at starting a Sons at the Range event. “We’ll see how that goes. If we have three boys, we’ll consider that a success,” she smiles. This year’s girls’ event is planned for June 10. Registration opens on April 15 with a deadline of May 20. For more information or to register go to http://www.daughtersattherange.com/ or call (325) 224-8747.

6.5 Creedmoor vs .308 Winchester: Which is Better For Hunting & Survival?

Advertisment There are two rounds that continue to dominate the long-range rifle shooting world: .308 Winchester and 6.5mm Creedmoor. Each round has its pros and cons, its benefits and its negatives, and its supporters and detractors. These are the rounds that you find on the firing line at every competition, in the hands of more than a few hunters, and even in military and police sniper weapons. With so many supporters on both sides, a controversy is inevitable: the 6.5 Creedmoor vs .308 Winchester debate. The reason for the big kerfuffle is that the rounds occupy a very similar niche with other rifles (even the 30-06 ). Indeed, most rifles chambered in one of the two calibers will also be available chambered in the other.  This has lead to some disagreements among shooters, unfolding into today’s 6.5 Creedmoor vs .308 Winchester debate. We’re going to settle this debate today by declaring a winner between the venerable and legendary .308, and the upstart 6.5mm Creedmoor. Let’s compare them now, the 6.5 Creedmoor vs .308 Winchester. Contents 6.5 Creedmoor vs .308 Winchester History History: .308 Winchester History: 6.5 Creedmoor 6.5 Creedmoor vs .308 Winchester Ballistics Ballistics: .308 Winchester Ballistics: 6.5 Creedmoor 6.5 Creedmoor vs .308 Winchester Ammunition Ammunition: .308 Winchester Ammunition: 6.5 Creedmoor 6.5 Creedmoor vs .308 Winchester: Which is Better? 6.5 Creedmoor vs .308 Winchester: Parting Shots 6.5 Creedmoor vs . "308 Winchester History" History: .308 Winchester The .308 Winchester was born in the period following WWII, as the Korean War was winding down. It was developed primarily as a lighter-recoiling alternative to the .30-06 rounds that were used in American service rifles at the time. The US military and other allied militaries wanted a more controllable round than the .30-06 for fully-automatic weapons. Winchester was one of a few companies in the running to produce a short-action, long-range-capable round that was easier to shoot on full-auto, and lighter to carry. This gave rise to the 7.62x51mm round and the guns that used it, the M14 service rifle and the M60 machine gun , both around 1957. Before that, however, Winchester saw that there might be some civilian interest in the new round, and in 1952 they released the .308 Winchester round we know and love today. Since then, the .308 Winchester has gone on to become the single most popular medium to large game round on the planet, and probably the most popular long-range round period, thanks to its adoption by NATO in 7.61x51mm form. Today, the .308 is alive and well and can be found wherever ammunition is sold, just about anywhere on the planet. It is incredibly popular with civilians and with militaries around the world, and can be found in the hands of soldiers, police, hunters, target shooters, and more. History: 6.5 Creedmoor The 6.5 Creedmoor (CM) round was developed much more recently . In fact, I remember when it was released, all the way back in 2007. In this admittedly short time, the 6.5 Creedmoor has taken the long-range shooting world by storm and is a big part of why precision rifle shooting has exploded in popularity in the past decade or so. The reason for the round’s success is simple: it’s very, very good. Which is what you’d expect from a round developed by the top shooters and ballistic scientists at ammunition legend, Hornady. They were interested in developing a round that could perform better than other 6.5mm projectiles at long range, and they settled on the long, skinny, ballistically outstanding bullet in a modified .30TC case, which is itself a modified .308 case. Today, the 6.5 Creedmoor is one of the more popular rounds for reaching out past four hundred yards, and it is beloved by hunters and precision target shooters the world over. It has taken numerous National Match trophies and is sold by just about every ammo manufacturer on the planet. How does this round compare to the .308 though? Let’s take a look. 6.5 Creedmoor vs . "308 Winchester Ballistics" Ballistics: .308 Winchester The .308 has an overall length of 2.75” and a bullet diameter of .308” (somewhat obviously). Modern .308 ammo is most commonly found loaded with 150, 168, and 180gr bullets, although 125gr options are also available. For most game, the larger bullets are preferred, but the 150gr stuff is usually cheaper. Getting into bullet weights vs. intended use is going to have to be a subject for another article. For our purposes, we’ll assume you have a 150gr projectile leaving your barrel at 2820fps. At five hundred yards, that bullet is going to drop about 56”, and about 399” at 1000 yards. Velocity wise, you’re going to see a drop of about 1000fps to 1835fps at 500 yards, and by the 1000 yard mark, the round will have gone subsonic at about 1100fps. This is the chief problem with .308, and is what the 6.5mm Creedmoor is looking to correct. The .308 round loses velocity and drops rapidly past 500 yards, and is really stretching itself past 800. This makes it less than ideal at these ranges, especially if you’re trying to reach even further to ring the gong at 1000 yards. That said, it’s still a very good round, especially inside of 600 yards which is where the round really shines. And there’s no denying proven, literally battle-tested results. The .308 is still in service around the world and likely will be for years to come. Ballistics: 6.5 Creedmoor The 6.5 Creedmoor has an overall cartridge length of 2.825 inches, which allows it to also be chambered in short-action bolt guns, and in semi-automatic AR-10-style rifles. It has a maximum case length of 1.92”. The .264” (6.706mm) diameter bullets commonly come in weights between 120 and 143gr, which is the ideal weight range. The cartridge is designed for barrels with a 1:8” rotation, and that’s what you’ll find in most rifles. This is optimal for the very heavy (relatively speaking) bullets. Ballistically, the 6.5 Creedmoor resembles the .260 Remington, which itself remains a popular long-range hunting and target cartridge. It also approaches .300 WM velocity, albeit with much less muzzle energy. Inside 600 yards, the upper limit of the .308’s ideal performance, the 6.5 Creedmoor has a slight advantage in velocity. However, it’s not super noticeable for most shooters, especially against paper targets. Where the 6.5 Creedmoor really shines is out past this range, where it holds its velocity much better than almost any round in its class, and certainly better than anything else you can just pop by the local sporting goods store and buy by the case. At 800 yards, it drops almost half a foot less than the .308, and is still moving at supersonic speeds. At 1000 yards, you’re reaching the maximum effective range of the round, but it can still punch holes in paper accurately. It’ll also drop about 15-18% less than .308. A 24” barrel will best help you take advantage of the 6.5 Creedmoor’s excellent velocity numbers, but a lighter, more maneuverable 22” barrel is close enough that it might be a better choice for anyone but benchrest shooters and true accuracy nuts. You’re only losing about 17fps of muzzle velocity, so even if you are chasing the best accuracy possible, you might still want the shorter barrel. Overall, you should think of the 6.5 Creedmoor as a smaller, lighter, version of the .300 Win Mag. Best of all, the recoil is much, much lighter, and is much more suited to the 6.5 Creedmoor’s place as the king of the long-range, AR-compatible, calibers. 6.5 Creedmoor vs . "308 Winchester Ammunition" Ammunition: .308 Winchester There are a huge number of .308 factory loads out there, but here’s some of the best, and a few of my personal favorites. For hunting, I like the old reliable option, Remington Core-Lokt’s in 168gr. I’ve taken whitetail, elk, and bighorn sheep with this cartridge, and I know it’s been used reliably for other similarly-sized game like black bear and antelope. Another great option is Federal Premium Vital-Shok, another well-beloved hunting round. For competition, I use handloads topped with Hornady’s 168gr ELD-M. If I need a good off-the-shelf round, I default to either Hornady’s Match 168gr or Black Hills 180gr. Both have won me matches, and both have done well in national match competitions. For general use, such as longer-range plinking, you have a ton of cheap options. Wolf, Black Bear, and other lower-end manufacturers that focus on military-grade (not a synonym for quality). My favorite is Monarch 145gr FMJ, which I bought about three thousand rounds of back in 2015, and it’s been serving me well ever since. Its dirt cheap, and they make enough of it every year that you’ll have no problem finding it in stock (unlike my favorite 9mm ammunition for a carbine ). Let’s look at 6.5 CM now. Ammunition: 6.5 Creedmoor First of all, I’m going to take a moment to plug reloading as an option for 6.5 CM. Handloading a round to your exact specifications will always be superior to factory loads, but you can really see benefits with 6.5 CM. For hunting, Hornady’s 143gr Precision Hunter ELD-X round is phenomenal. Hornady makes great ammo for just about every caliber . I don’t think I’ve had a deer take a single step after being hit with one of these, and I’ve been very impressed with its availability. Other than that, Remington Core-Lokt’s and Federal Fusion in your favorite bullet weight will also get the job done. For serious target work, all of Hornady’s ELD loads will do great, but I like the heavier 147gr loads. Other than that, I have had great success past 1000 yards with Winchester’s 140gr hollowpoint boat-tail loads. For plinking, there’s not a lot. If you’re just looking to pick up practice ammo, you’re still going to be paying a dollar a round, so you might as well get the good stuff. That said, there’s enough $.75/round stuff out there like Hornday’s American Gunner line that you can save a little and not feel quite so bad about tearing up soda bottles and beer cans at 100 yards. You can also get things like Remington’s High-Performance Rifle line which, while far from match quality, are still more than adequate for ringing steel at longer ranges. 6.5 Creedmoor vs .308 Winchester: Which is Better? Does that mean the 6.5mm Creedmoor is better? No. Mostly. It exceeds in velocity, bullet drop, ballistic coefficient, and energy transfer to the target. It also has better performance at longer ranges. That being said, there are some reasons to choose .308 over 6.5mm Creedmoor. First and foremost, if you’re dealing strictly with shorter ranges, take advantage of the lower cost of .308 rifles and ammo. That brings us to the .308’s chief advantage over 6.5mm Creedmoor: price.  Like other calibers and rifles , price always makes a difference. Every Western military on the planet, including NATO, favors the .308. That means cheap, cheap, cheap ammo. While 6.5 Creedmoor is available most places, you still can’t get the sheer variety of cheap surplus ammo that you can get with .308 Winchester. Of course, that may change now that the US government is adopting 6.5mm Creedmoors. But for now, .308 is the superior budget long-range round. 6.5mm Creedmoor is better for serious competitors and those who want to get the best performance possible. In the end, it comes down to personal preference. 6.5 Creedmoor vs .308 Winchester: Parting Shots I know I said I was going to give you a definitive answer one way or another in the 6.5mm Creedmoor vs. .308 Winchester debate. The truth is, there just isn’t one. Both of these rounds have their upside, in the end. If you’re looking for something that will reach the very limits of your abilities, go with the 6.5mm Creedmoor. If you’re looking for something affordable, but will still ring the gong at 500 yards, maybe try the .308 Winchester. So, which one are you most interested in?

Summary

Manufactured by O. F. Mossberg & Sons, Mossberg 500 is a series of pump-action shotguns, very much treasured for their reliability and value.